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  • Surf

    Volcom Hawaii Pipe House History - Banzai Pipeline, North Shore, Oahu

    The Volcom Pipe House is a legendary house located directly in front of Banzai Pipeline. With countless years of iconic surfing history to its name, we dive into its history Since 1995, the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii has been an important part of the Volcom story. In the first part of our Volcom Hawaii houses history we looked back at all the places we were lucky to have stayed: from Rocky Point to Banzai Pipeline, and a handful of spots in between, there has been a wealth of stories to share. Dave Riddle, Keanu Taylor, Diesel Storm on the third story balcony of the Volcom Pipe House In this second part of our Hawaii houses history, Volcom Hawaii veteran and coach Dave Riddle recounts the history of the famed Volcom Pipe House, a.k.a., the Gerry Lopez Pipe House. "Mr. Pipeline" (Gerry Lopez) built this house in the late '70s and is a legendary Pipeline surfer and surfboard shaper. Locals and surfers simply call it "The Pipe House." Volcom Pipe House, a.k.a., Gerry Lopez Pipe House In 2000, Volcom moved the team house from Ted’s Bakery to a single-story house in front of Banzai Pipeline, one of the deadliest, yet perfect waves in the world, where it continued to provide room and board for team riders and guests for the following seven years. In 2007, the team expanded to the house next door, the Volcom Pipe House (Gerry House), where it continues to be one of the most iconic gathering places in surfing history. When Volcom first moved into this house, guys like Bruce Irons claimed one of the top floor rooms, and deservingly so after winning the Pipe Masters and proving his expertise out at Pipeline. Along with Bruce came Dave Wassel and Tai Vandyke who kept a watchful eye over both houses considering their proximity to one another. Soon, the Volcom Pipe House turned into the hot spot for everyone on the team to stay and visit. Early frequenters included Kaimana Henry, Gavin Beschen, Tom Dosland, Dusty Payne, among others. Front-row view of Banzai Pipeline from the Pipe House living room In 2000, Volcom moved the team house from Ted’s Bakery to a single-story house in front of Banzai Pipeline, one of the deadliest, yet perfect waves in the world, where it continued to provide room and board for team riders and guests for the following seven years. In 2007, the team expanded to the house next door, the Volcom Pipe House (Gerry House), where it continues to be one of the most iconic gathering places in surfing history. When Volcom first moved into this house, guys like Bruce Irons claimed one of the top floor rooms, and deservingly so after winning the Pipe Masters and proving his expertise out at Pipeline. Along with Bruce came Dave Wassel and Tai Vandyke who kept a watchful eye over both houses considering their proximity to one another. Soon, the Volcom Pipe House turned into the hot spot for everyone on the team to stay and visit. Early frequenters included Kaimana Henry, Gavin Beschen, Tom Dosland, Dusty Payne, among others. During big surf contests like the Pipe Masters and Volcom Pipe Pro, which happen right in front of the house, you'll see guys like Kelly Slater and John John Florence hanging in the front yard, chatting with friends and watching the contest. It's a heavy-hitter sighting place and hotspot for any media. There are also insane views of Pipeline and the North Shore coastline from some old World War II bunkers located in the hills behind the two Volcom Pipe House that are definitely worth checking out if you're in the area. Volcom Pipe House - North Shore, Oahu, Hawaii To be invited to stay here as a Volcom team rider, you have to charge Pipeline and prove that you can handle this beast of a wave. Up-and-comers from the Volcom team learn from the locals and Volcom coaches such as Dave Riddle and Jason Shibata, who have spent years surfing and watching this wave in every condition imaginable. To be welcomed into this house is a blessing and a true part of surfing history, and we're honored to carry on the legacy of such an amazing house. In addition to being the only three-story house originally allowed on this stretch of beach, it's also the very first surf brand house on Oahu's North Shore to be solar-friendly and powered by solar electricty (as is our smaller house next door) which began as a continued effort to further our sustainability commitments by installing solar panels on the roofs of both Volcom houses. Thanks, Rising Sun Solar! Solar panels overlooking Ehukai Beach Park Michael O'Shaughnessy surfing down from the Volcom Pipe House
  • Surf

    Volcom Hawaii Houses History on the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii

    Since 1995, Volcom has held a strong presence on the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii with multiple Volcom Hawaii houses and even more legendary stories It was the winter of '95/'96 when Volcom landed their first spot at Rocky Point on the North Shore of Oahu, welcoming team riders Dave Wassel, Gavin Beschen, Kaleo Roberson, Tai Vandyke, Shawn "Barney" Barron, among others, into the mix as the brand first started to get its roots on the North Shore. As the Volcom Hawaii family began to grow and the early-day Volcom house parties were at its height, the team bounced around to different houses on the North Shore between 1995 and 2000. From Rocky Point to Velzyland (V-land) to Backyards to Ted's Bakery, and finally to where the Volcom Pipe Houses are now (which includes the Gerry House) at Banzai Pipeline, it has been nothing short of one hell of a ride, and we are thankful for everything Hawaii has provided us. While 2018 is well past our 20 year mark holding strong on the North Shore, we look to another 20 years full of good waves, good friends and good times! First Volcom house at Banzai Pipeline To survive in the country is to be yourself. Don’t put on no act for nobody, but yourself. Just rely on yourself, and rely on your friends in some sort of way as the boys being there for each other. And that’s what it’s all about. -Scotty Fountain In the fall of 2009, we produced an eight-part video series titled The Volcom House Show highlighting the two Volcom houses where we invited different hosts and guests into the mix to show us what life is like inside the houses. One of those episodes included Valient Himself and the rest of the Valient Thorr crew surfing and playing music on the porch of the first Volcom Pipe house: "Life is good. Just another hangover day in beautiful Hawaii." -Eddie Boy (L to R): First Volcom Pipe House front yard hosting veteran Hawaii surf photographer Brian Bielmann, legendary surfer Herbie Fletcher, and Volcom Hawaii veterans Gavin Beschen and Tai Vandyke Volcom Hawaii Houses locations on the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii
  • Surf

    "Home, Sweet Home" with Joan Duru

    Joan is a huge fan of barrels, which is why this video edit is packed with nothing but France beach break barrels. Before his start on the 2018 World Surf League Championship Tour, Joan enjoyed a short break at home, snagging a couple good days during a not-so-good winter. Good luck to Joan on the 2018 Championship Tour!
  • Surf

    Xo Coco Ho Documentary - A Look at the Famous Surfer's Career

    This is the compelling story of Coco Ho and her 10 years on tour Dive into the colorful story of female surfer Coco Ho from Oahu’s North Shore and learn how she got started surfing, her rich surfing family history, ups and downs on the Championship Tour, and everything in between. Including exclusive interviews with brother, Mason Ho, father, Michael Ho, and world champion surfers John John Florence and Stephanie Gilmore. Coco Ho picked up surfing at an early age Coco Ho started surfing at the young age of seven after following in the footsteps of her brother and father. As Coco recalls, "I just remember trying to impress my brother. My whole growing up was all to impress Mason." Mason Ho and Coco Ho Living and learning on the tour for the past 10 years now, Coco is looking forward to focusing solely on her surfing and letting it speak for itself. She's in the right mindset, has the ability, and feels more inspired and energized than ever before. "I'm not going to let anything get in the way this time. I'm going for the world title." Today, Coco has won over 25 surfing awards and has been voted a top three fan favorite in Surfer Magazine's Surfer Poll Take a look at a two-part excerpt from the edit with Coco Ho, Mason Ho, and Michael Ho:
  • Surf

    SIMPLE - New edit of Yael Peña

    SIMPLE is a piece about Yael Peña, created after a trip to Indonesia, just looking for free surfing. No pressure. All about finding a paradise and spend a few days enjoying the waves and the sur PRODUCER: Vivalafin Studio instagram.com/vivalafin/ FILM BY: Rayco Cano instagram.com/raycocano/ RIDER: Yael Peña instagram.com/yaelpesu/ CAMERA: Ginés Díaz instagram.com/ginesdiaz/ MUSIC: OHHHHH by Moran - Two LOCATION: Sumbawa - Indonesia  
  • Surf

    High Surf Action Cut from OSMO THROMBO

    Looking for a stripped down surf porn fix? We got you. Noa Deane, Ozzie Wright and Mitch Coleborn shred their brains out in this 10-minute-modified, condensed, cut-down, stipped, surf porn, whatever-you-want-to-call-it, all surf action version of Osmo Thrombo, the 25-minute tripped out surf adventure on a mysterious Indonesian island that quickly unravels into the most bizarre experience of their lives… and ultimately a mission to rescue Mitch. All storytelling scenes have been removed in this modified version for your instant surf-fix needs. But, if you've got the time, if you're in the mood for laughs, if you want to see why Noa is scared of rainbows, want to watch Ozzie have an outer-body experience, or see Mitch get abducted by a monstrous butterfly, then click here to watch Osmo Thrombo in its entire glory.

Aktuelle Nachrichten + Videos

Surf
Euro Thrash Video: Volcom Surf's European Vacation
Our good friends at Wasted Talent put together a video of some of our riders: Noa Deane, Ryan Burch, Gony Zubizarreta, and more, thrashing their way through Portugal, Spain, and France during their summer '17 European vacation. From scoring one of the best days of surf they've ever seen at The Cave, to touring the local watering holes and taverns, to getting caught up in a weird presidental campaign in Paris, there was no shortage of amusement and European debauchery. It was a great trip that surely lived up to its name: Euro Thrash. The team riders, photographers, and crew, all became great friends by the end of the trip and ended on a promise to all return back soon. Euro Thrash 2.0?
Surf
Osmo Thrombo - The Lo-fi B-movie of Hi-fi Shredding
The Real Journey of an Unreal Surf Flick, Osmo Thrombo. Words by Tom Carey Sometimes plans are meant to be changed. We set out to document a surf trip in Australia and ended up in Indonesia. Nate Leal (videographer) and I (still photographer) flew from California to Sydney ready to jump on another flight to Brisbane to meet up with surfers Ozzie Wright, Noa Deane, and Mitch Coleborn, along with Mikey Mallalieu (Aussie videographer). However, during the long trans Pacific flight, the forecast and weather turned grim to say the least. So, in the Sydney airport, we lined up last minute flights, accommodations, and transfers for all of us to one of Indo’s mysto, less frequented islands. The swell forecast was better than what Australia had in mind for us, and sometimes you just need to get surfers out of their comfort zone and on the road. Noa and beauties from another world. Mitch, Ozzie and Noa travel zonked at the ferry boarding station. You never know who you’re gonna meet while waiting for your boat to come in… ..And you never know who you’ll be invited to hang with once out to sea. The locals enjoyed our company and had some good laughs. Indo is a far trek for anyone coming from Cali, but once you tack on another flight, and a three-hour van ride, followed by a two-hour ferry ride, and a final thirty minutes by car, you’re talking about a hefty journey. So, you pray the waves are worth it. No shortage of post card views along the way. Village life. Finding beach shade was key to survival on our destination island. (Noa is seen here in the Mag Vibes Stoneys Boardshorts.) The big goon himself, Ozzie Wright, marks trails and takes his own shade with him everywhere he goes. Ozzie and the best way to shower off days of travel grime. Ozzie out of the shower and right back into being a slob. Noa indy… going big and tech in the natural world. Apparently, all the plane flights to get there wasn’t enough air time for Mitch. Post-surf refueling. All I can say is that these were no ordinary coconuts... ...Just ask Ozzie. The next few days were a back-and-forth mission between the left, and a right-hander situated in a massive bay with the most picturesque views framing the photos. The boys assaulted the right’s chunky sections. The maxed out conditions at the right made for some tricky situations, but when you found a good one, the ramps were massive! Mitch’s backhand is second to none, as seen here. After blowing out a fin box, Noa still managed to nail a few more airs there. But, the right just didn’t produce enough to make it into the film we were there to shoot. As fickle as it was, the left became our bread and butter. We were chipping away at our trip. We were working hard when struck by challenges such as our van bottoming out in a mean little ditch on a rutted, dirt road, and playing hard to compile an epic batch of clips. Ozzie and his favorite travel companion. The little ditch that stopped us in our tracks. Gathering rocks to wedge under the tires and try to lift the van high enough to drive out of the ditch. Noa spotting something unexpected at the left that would completely alter the rest of the trip. (Watch the flick, Osmo Thrombo, about this adventure to found out what.) Ozzie, Mitch and Noa at the Tropical Beach Alien Communication Centre. Ozzie tuned in. We were happy, but we still hadn’t scored that one all-time perfect day that you travel deep into the outer reaches for. It left us hungry for more. We woke up the last full day of the trip to a much bigger swell. The tide was in our favor and the winds were light enough for us to check out a fabled heavy tube that sits a boat ride away from the shore of a deep, cliff-lined bay. At low tide it’s ultra shallow. You need to knife your take-off directly into the barrel or you can plan on scrapping yourself off the reef. Sure enough, we rolled up to the shore and saw low-tide kegs freight training out in the distance of the bay. We rented an indo canoe powered by a five-horse-power-converted weed whacker outboard. We excitedly jumped in the boat for the ride to the line-up. At first, from this closer vantage point, it looked as if the tide was actually too low. Suddenly, a few crazy waves pulsed in that got the boys out there immediately. But, once in the water, we found ourselves settling for less. Although fun, nothing rolled in for a while as sick as what we previously saw. To make matters worse, a crazy rain squall moved in and unleashed on us. It was raining so hard that the boat was filling up with water. Then, after about 20 minutes of nonstop, torrential downpour, it was as if some higher power came down and said, “Hey, let me help you out here,” and the rain stopped like the flip of a switch. A light offshore wind kicked in, and the waves started pumping. As if a spell was cast, the conditions went from average to absolutely going off. It was unworldly. Ozzie’s wave-count doubled everyone else's on the trip. He’s all smiles here after getting barreled for 50 yards across the shallow reef. After the rain squall, the wave became a full-fledge photo studio. Mitch just inches away from my camera. The power of a fisheye lens. We substituted the sun for offshore winds. Ozzie approved. A few gems came in before the squall. Noa found the best one. Mitch mid-pump on a little screamer. We traded off long waves of multi-section pits for six hours straight that day. It was the all-time session we were hoping for. We watched the footage that night, pinching ourselves and sharing the stoke of each other’s waves. Celebratory madness ensued, joking “rite of passage” haircuts went down: Mitch got the first cut and rocked it the rest of the trip. The next morning we woke up to onshore slop. The ocean was done and so were we. It was time to go home. Journey complete. Hours of footage and tons of stories. What was next to do? Ryan Thomas to tweak all the footage into what would become OSMO THROMBO… The lo-fi, cult, surf action, adventure, dramatic, sci-fi, fantasy, bro-mantic, comedy, feel good, B-movie of outer limits, hi-fi shredding and interstellar tube time, that quickly unravels into the most bizarre experience of our lives… and ultimately a mission to rescue Mitch. Three of them was a handful. I couldn’t imagine keeping track of nine. Until next time!
Surf
Osmo Thrombo - The Lo-fi B-movie of Hi-fi Shredding
Release Date: August 31, 2017 Check Back Here Tomorrow Official trailer for OSMO THROMBO... The lo-fi, cult, surf action, adventure, dramatic, sci-fi, fantasy, bro-mantic, comedy, feel good, B-movie of outer limits hi-fi shredding, and interstellar tube time with Ozzie Wright, Mitch Coleborn & Noa Deane on a feverish trip that quickly unravels into the most bizarre experience of their lives… and ultimately a mission to rescue Mitch. Based on a real life happening documented by Nate Leal, Mikey Mallalieu & Tom Carey, heavily tweaked by Ryan Thomas.
Surf
Not Your Average Wipeouts - Excerpts from “The Dock”
Not everyday you’re going to watch a wipeout video like this. Sure, sports have their varied crash and burns, errors and fails, but when it comes to surfing, there’s only a few things that could go wrong. Although, when you’re dealing with this unusual stunt that was put together by Stab and Volcom, you’re going to get all sorts of wipeouts and fails, none of which has been experienced by any surfer until now. It was both parts thrilling and dangerous to attempt what these guys conquered. Anchoring a 100-foot floating dock in the middle of a surf break to ease the entry into riding a wave seemed questionable. The dock ripped from its anchor a couple times and trampled its way to the shore. The surfers slipped off its wet surface countless times. Some misjudged its location in the lineup and had to jump to safety, and others had to duck and cover as the dock whipped around like a snake when the waves started breaking. Was it worth it? Of course it was. Would we do it again? Of course we would. It’s all part of the experience of going out on a limb and trying something new. Something that hasn’t been done before to give the people something worth viewing. The Dock was a memorable event, and we couldn't have done it without Stab. Special thanks also goes out to our team riders who joined us in this venture, and the entire production crew who made it all possible. Watch 'THE DOCK'Watch 'THE MAKING OF'     Noa Deane (left) using an alternate route to safety, while photographer Tom Carey is caught mid-strategy in his attempt for cover. Imai Devault negotiating his way up the ramp between Yago Dora and Balaram Stack. Ozzie Wright sits in the far distance with time to spare. Balaram had a long run at this thing. Unfortunately, he ended up slipping right at the end and gave Yago a front row seat to a good laugh. Ozzie Wright, miscalculating. Mitch Coleborn didn't anticipate this wave breaking out that far. Clearly. Yago taking a leap of faith off the dock to safety. Balaram attempting a successful run at the right, while Noa looks to the left to make sure he's good to go. What does one do in a situation like this? Understandably, the dudes jump off the dock, trying to get as far away from it as possible in hopes it doesn't whip around and tag them.
Surf
Volcom Family Finals: Coco Ho & Maud Le Car
Volcom’s World Tour competitor Coco Ho and French competition surfer Maud Le Car are paralleling leaving disappointment behind they have both individually found their stride. Coco began to turn her season around at the Supergirl Pro, then solidified her strength in front of the whole world with a 3rd place finish at the US Open of Surfing just weeks ago. At the same Open event, Maud knocked out favored 3x World Championship surfer Stephanie Gilmore. Then here in Anglet again showed no mercy eliminating local hero Pauline Ado in the semis; to meet Coco Ho fellow Volcom team rider in the finals. The final heat didn’t offer the most wave opportunity; no stranger to these kind of tough situations Coco Ho took the win taking a shot at every wave the poor surf conditions had to offer. Congratulations to both our girls finishing #1 & #2 in France.
Surf
The Making Of “The Dock” | Go Behind The Scenes With Volcom’s Surf Team
This has got to be one of the sketchiest things we’ve ever done. I mean, would you pull the trigger on this concept and put some of the world's best surfers at risk? We’re in an age where everything’s been done. Where content gets exported by the dozens. Where repetition and derived ideas seem to be the norm. What breaks through clutter and what gets lost in 24 hours? There needs to be something more. So, we met up with our friends over at Stab and started talking about some potential ideas. When you enlist Stab’s wizardy and sunburnt minds to discuss surfing’s next move, you get oodles of high-to-higher outrageous, yet dangerously entertaining ideas. We labored over many of those ideas and found a winner. What was once a long and arduous process has finally come to fruition. And we’re truly passionate about it. Watch "The Dock" Benoa Harbour, Indonesia. What are we talking about? We’re talking about “The Dock.” A 100-foot floating dock that we put in the middle of a surf break and invited a select crew to try out. We knew it was time do something different. Something new. Something which our team riders would be stoked on, and something that we would have fun doing and showing to our audiences. It’s part of our DNA to keep things fun and embrace the strange. It’s a grocery bag full of first-time stunts and wildly-entertaining fails. The strenuous journey of anchoring this floating dock in the middle of a surf break can take its tolls, but it was all worth it. Noa hops, Imai falls, Yago attempts. Mitch going for broke. He is wearing the Volcom X Noa Deane Mag Vibes Stoneys Boardshorts While dangerous, unpredictable, and unsecured, towing this 100-foot piece of equipment out into the ocean at 4am in a foreign land feels like you’ve already won. Were you sitting at your desk editing a two-to-four-foot beach break clip or sitting on the beach filming perfect barrels? No, you were near the pinnacle of an out-of-left-field concept that no one thought was possible. But you were there, and you made it, although no one said it was going to be this hard. Did we say it was dangerous? There was the obvious threat of the dock breaking off and crashing into you, but there were others. There are wires, ropes, tons of waves, other surfers / surfboards, and the dock itself whipping around freely as if it had no boundaries. As Noa recalls, “It kicks like a snake. It does this weird snake thing and it whips right at the end.” Balaram had a near-serious injury when he was trying to make his way to safety after jumping off the dock over a wave: “For a split second, time slowed down and I was like, ‘I’m about to die, I’m going head-first into this thing!'” Balaram and his memorable time with the dock. Balaram ended up slipping off the end and went down pretty hard. The 100-foot dock broke away from its anchor and nearly tumbled over Ozzie (see video). But, it was all in good fun. It was a team of guys experiencing a first-of-its-kind, further stretched from their comfort zones than ever. “I like the chaos of everybody there going, ‘where are we going, where are we going!?’” said Ozzie. It’s always fun until it’s not. One of the scariest parts of the shoot was when a huge set rolled in and the dock snapped off the anchors and floated into shore, nearly tagging Ozzie and Imai. Luckily, our dudes have cat-like reflexes and managed to escape sure-injury. Imai recalls, “I dove under it and the thing went over, and my board was on the side and I had to take my leash off underwater because it was stuck.” After some minor repairs, the team got the dock back out into position and finished off their three-day mission. We should've known Stab would think of a gem-of-an-idea like this. We never thought this would actually be possible. We didn't think we were really going to go through with it. But, we did, and we are sure as hell glad we did. Thank you to Stab, our team riders, production, the crew, Candock, and everyone else who was apart of this project. We hope you enjoyed “The Dock.” Noa's wearing the Macaw Mod Boardshorts. Traffic jam. Noa leaps off the dock for another attempt.